Berkeley Arts Festival Calendar

10/19/2018

Super Cinema @Central

August 2018
Pictures from the Tumultuous 70s
Friday, August 3   The Last Picture Show 1971 / 118 min. / R / CC


The time is 1951 in a tiny Texas town. A diner, a pool hall and the Royal movie theater are the only places to go, "except to bed," critic Roger Ebert wryly comments in his review. Best friends Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges) lust after a phony rich girl (Cybill Shepherd). Adults mostly guard their secrets. In the end, loss shakes loose some authentic emotion from the friends. Cloris Leachman and Ellen Burstyn are superb in supporting roles.


 
Friday, August 10   A Woman Under the Influence 1974 / 155 min. / R / CC


An LA housewife and mother, Mabel (Gena Rowlands), is unpredictable, sometimes volatile, sometimes overly friendly, to the extent that her construction worker husband, Nick (Peter Falk), wonders about her ability to handle the life they lead. Stellar performances from both leads make this an essential movie experience. Gena Rowlands won several Best Actress awards for it. The writer-director, John Cassavettes, is an icon of independent film.


 
Friday, August 17 One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest     1975 / 133 min. / R / CC


Considered to be among the greatest films ever, Cuckoo's Nest is the story of a funny and often satisfying power struggle between a cocky recidivist felon (Jack Nicholson) and an authoritarian mental hospital nurse (Louise Fletcher). It's based on a Ken Kesey novel, boasts a near perfect ensemble cast (including Christopher Lloyd, Brad Dourif and Danny DeVito) and won all the major awards: Best Picture, Actor, Actress, Director and Screenplay.


 
Friday, August 24 Taxi Driver 1976 / 113 min. / R / CC


After being discharged from the Vietnam-era Marines, Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) drives a taxi in New York City. He's a loner who forms attachments to inappropriate women-a  presidential campaign worker (Cybill Shepherd) and a 15 year old prostitute (Jodie Foster), whom he wants to protect. Pushed over the edge by their rejections, he begins to stalk the corrupt, sleazy guys who employ them. Martin Scorsese directs this thriller as black comedy.


 
Friday, August 31 Chinatown 1974 / 130 min. / R / CC


In a story based on the early twentieth century California Water Wars, private eye Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) takes a job following a Department of Water and Power engineer-who soon turns up dead. Immediately, Gittes is led by the engineer's widow (Faye Dunaway) to peel away layer after layer of corruption and mystery surrounding her husband's death. Directed by Roman Polanski, Chinatown is another of our greatest-and most beautifully shot-films.


 
September 2018
About Workers' Movements
Friday, September 7       Matewan        1987 / 135 min. / PG-13 / CC


It's 1920 in the town of Matewan, West Virginia. When Stone Mountain Coal Company cuts the wages of rebellious coal miners and brings in African American replacements, a United Mine Workers man (Chris Cooper) arrives to organize a union. In response, the company hires private detectives to oppose the miners and to set blacks and whites against each other. Tensions boil over, leading to a historic battle. James Earl Jones plays the character who leads black miners.


 
Friday, September 14       The Help          2011 / 146 min. / PG-13 / no CC


In 1963, Aibileen Clark (Viola Davis) agrees to let aspiring writer Skeeter Phelan (Emma Stone) interview her about her experiences as a maid to white families in Jackson, Mississippi. Gradually, other maids risk their jobs to join in with their own harrowing stories, which are all intended to yield a change-making book. Great storytelling and character development make this film exceptional. The ensemble cast also includes Octavia Spencer and David Oyelowo.
 
Friday, September 21      Blue Collar      1978  / 114 min. / R / no CC


Three Detroit auto workers (Richard Pryor, Harvey Keitel & Yaphet Kotto) are buddies on and off work. They feel trapped between big industry and their do-nothing, corrupt union. They hit on a plan to rob the safe in the union office, leading to complications that lay bare the terrible predicament of working people. Written and directed by Paul Schrader (writer of Taxi Driver), who delivers an authentic, uncompromising ending. It's a very powerful film.


 
Friday, September 28      North Country       2005 / 126 min. / R / CC


Josey Aimes (Charlize Theron) flees her abusive husband with two kids to stay with her parents in her North Dakota home town. Most jobs available to her pay very little, so a friend (Frances McDormand) encourages her to apply to work in the same mine where she and Josie's father work. Josie's demeaning experiences there eventually drive her to start a legal fight with the mining company. Based on a true story, and directed by Niki Caro ("Whale Rider").

3pm to 5pm, 2090 Kittredge St. (at Shattuck)
Berkeley, CA 94704


David Wilson, violin;Barbara Blaker Krumdieck, cello; and Katherine Heater, harpsichord "Joyful Mysteries" - Biber's Scordatura Sonatas and More

David Wilson, the Bay Area's primo Biber Wizard, brings us highlights of H. I. F. Biber's extraordinary "Rosary Sonatas" (aka "Mystery Sonatas"; the title page is missing, so no-one knows what Biber meant to call them, but that hasn't stopped a lot of musicologists spending a lot of time learnedly speculating about it).  He has assembled an all-star continuo cast (Barbara Blaker Krumdieck, cello; and Katherine Heater, harpsichord) who both bring their own virtuosic abilities to the party.

Biber was way ahead of Joni Mitchell in inventing radical new tunings, and although he didn't invent as many as Ms. Mitchell, he did also invent radically new fiddle techniques, which apparently only he could play (that was then; David has caught up with him, clearly).  Prepare to be amazed.

Friday, October 19, 2018, 6.00 pm
 94704
All tickets $15
18 and under admitted free and welcome.
Tickets at the door or reserve online (recommended) at
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3614318

6pm to 8pm, St. Mark's Episcopal Church Parish Hall, 2300 Bancroft Way, Berkeley


Best in Show - Stories from Beyond the Shelter - A Benefit to support Berkeley Humane's Lifesaving Mission -

7:00 PM RECEPTION | 8:00 PM PROGRAM
GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS $75
FREIGHT & SALVAGE THEATER

Join Berkeley Humane for Best in Show - Stories from Beyond the Shelter. Hosted by Dr. Michael Krasny, of the award-winning KQED Forum, this one-show performance is a live event sharing stories of the animal companions that shape our lives with love.

This evening event will feature popular local authors Julie Barton and Steven Winn. Julie Barton is a local writer and New York Times bestselling author of Dog Medicine, How My Dog Saved Me from Myself. Her story captures the anguish of depression, the slow path to recovery, the beauty of forgiveness, and the astonishing ways animals can help heal even the most broken hearts and minds. Steven Winn is a local award-winning arts journalist, fiction writer and City Arts & Lectures interviewer. Steven's book Come Back, Como: Winning the Heart of Reluctant Dog, is based on a beloved ten-part series originally published in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Rounding out the evening, the top entries of our pet storytelling contest will share their stories of how a dog or cat touched their lives. The contest winner will be awarded as Best in Show.

Tickets will be sold online and via the Freight & Salvage Theater box office. There will be a reception sponsored by Gilman Brewing Company and a silent auction before the event with all proceeds supporting Berkeley Humane.

Tickets available here: berkeleyhumane.org/bestinshow

7pm to 10pm, Freight & Salvage, 2020 Addison St Berkeley


Fandango Jarocho: Son Jarocho Jam Session

FREE -- Donations of any size are welcome and greatly appreciated!
Enjoy a lively evening of son jarocho music, dancing, and zapateado- bring your dance shoes and instruments, or just come and enjoy the music and dance! There is no entrance fee, but any monetary donations are accepted in support of programming at La Peña.

 
Son Jarocho is a lively traditional art form from the southern Mexican state of Veracruz that sits on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.It is a lyrical and danceable music genre that formed in the melding of three cultures: Arabic-Spanish, African and indigenous Mexican.  It is at the same time highly improvised and highly structured-filled with complex poly-rhythms and musical dialogue in its dance, song, poetry and music.  The basic instrumentation of the son jarocho includes the jarana jarocha, guitarra de son (both guitar-like instruments) and zapateado (percussive footwork).  Regional variations include the harp and various percussive instrum (View Full Event Description Here: https://lapena.org/event/fandango-jarocho-jam-sessio/2018-05-18/)

8pm to 11pm, 3105 Shattuck Ave, Berkeley, CA, 94705, United States