Berkeley Arts Festival Calendar

10/11/2018

Free Live Jazz

4:30pm to 6:30pm, The Musical Offering, 2430 Bancroft Way, Berkeley


Katya Cengel discusses Exiled: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back

Katya Cengel discusses Exiled: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back.

"Exiled" traces the story of violence through three generations of Cambodian-Americans by profiling a handful of families. It begins with the grandparents, the elderly who will soon be too old to tell their stories of survival. The violence they endured is recognized as the most brutal, a genocide that killed an estimated 20 percent of the Cambodian population. In Cambodia, the criminals have never fully been brought to justice and the victims remain largely silent. The silence is the same in the United States, where survivors have tried to leave their memories of random killing behind. But trauma like that cannot be escaped so easily, and it followed them, seeping back into their families through their children. The guidance, support and care they were often too traumatized to give their children left those same children vulnerable to gang recruitment. The second generation came of age amidst the violence of the past and the present.

The U.S. deported the criminals who did not hold citizenship, sending them back to a homeland their parents had given up everything to escape. They had neither the practical nor emotional skills to cope and their home country offered little help. In Cambodia they succumb to addiction and mental illness in large numbers. Then there is the third generation, the children, the ones still in America growing up without fathers and mothers, subjected to the violence of loss and longing. This is a story about how regimes as brutal as the Khmer Rouge and as benign as the United States have kept alive a legacy of violence and loss. There are no easy answers here, just the words of survivors and their descendants.

Katya Cengel is a freelance writer based in San Luis Obispo, California, and lectures in the Journalism Department of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She was a features and news writer for the Louisville Courier-Journal from 2003 to 2011 and has reported from North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Her work has appeared in New York Times Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, Marie Claire, and Newsweek. She is the author of Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life (Nebraska, 2012).

"A powerful and timely book on the generational impact of a particularly brutal chapter of the twentieth century-the Cambodian genocide of the 1970s. Exiled moves seamlessly from the killing fields of Cambodia to American immigrant communities, adding texture and perspective to the current debate on refugees, political asylum, cultural assimilation, and the deportation of Americanized immigrant criminals. Cengel humanizes this debate, bringing a deeper understanding of these hot-button issues. I strongly recommend this book."-Melvin Claxton, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

"Exiled comes at the right moment in our national debate about immigration and deportation. Katya Cengel's painfully detailed story about the maltreatment of the children of refugees we once welcomed should open our minds and hearts to the tyranny of ill-conceived laws and small-minded bureaucrats."-Elizabeth Becker, author of When the War Was Over: Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge Revolution

"An excellent and compelling account of Cambodian refugees' plight in the United States. . . . Once you read Exiled, you can't help but be empathetic and look at deportation through a new lens."-Jennifer Lau, author of Beautiful Hero: How We Survived the Khmer Rouge

"A multigenerational saga of violence and resurrection that plays out among several Cambodian-American families. . . . Katya Cengel movingly documents how trauma plays out across multiple generations, showing how the unresolved conflicts of the elders lead to catastrophic addiction and mental illness among the young. Cengel captures the full scale of this tragedy and writes with such compassion that anybody who picks up this book cannot fail to be moved."-Helen Thorpe, author of The Newcomers: Finding Refuge, Friendship, and Hope in an American Classroom

7:30pm to 8:30pm, Pegasus Books Downtown, 2349 Shattuck Avenue Berkeley


John Carreyrou presents BAD BLOOD: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

John Carreyrou presents BAD BLOOD: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
Thursday, October 11, 2018, 7:30pm

Tickets available now!

The full inside story of the breathtaking rise and shocking collapse of Theranos, the multibillion-dollar biotech startup, by the prize-winning journalist who first broke the story and pursued it to the end, despite pressure from its charismatic CEO and threats by her lawyers.

In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes's worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work.

A riveting story of the biggest corporate fraud since Enron, a tale of ambition and hubris set amid the bold promises of Silicon Valley.

--

John Carreyrou is a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter at The Wall Street Journal. For his extensive coverage of Theranos, Carreyrou was awarded the George Polk Award for Financial Reporting, the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism in the category of beat reporting, and the Barlett & Steele Silver Award for Investigative Business Journalism. Carreyrou lives in Brooklyn with his wife and three children.


Please note:

Duration of event is subject to author's preference.

Signing and additional details coming soon.

This event is all ages. Accessibility is important to us! If you have special needs of any kind, please write events AT booksmith DOT com and we will do our best to accommodate you.

7:30pm to 8:30pm, Hillside Club, 2286 Cedar St., Berkeley


"The Dark Shadow of Tech on the S.F. Bay Area"


Cary McClelland is a writer, filmmaker, lawyer, and rights advocate. His book is an eye-opening portrait of San Francisco transformed by the tech boom. Famously home to artists and activists, the birthplace of the Beats, the Black Panthers, and the LGBTQ movement-in recent decades the Bay Area has been reshaped by Silicon Valley, the engine of the new American economy. The richer the region gets, the more unequal and less diverse it becomes. Cracks in the city's facade-rapid gentrification, an epidemic of evictions, rising crime, atrophied public institutions-have started to appear. Cary McClelland spent several years interviewing people at the epicenter of the recent change, from venture capitalists and coders to politicians and protesters, from native sons and daughters to the city's newest arrivals. We hear from people who have passed through Apple, Google, eBay, Intel, and the other big tech companies of our time. We meet those who are experiencing changes at the grassroots level: a homeless advocate in Haight-Ashbury, an Oakland rapper, a pawnbroker in the Mission, a man who helped dismantle and rebuild the Bay Bridge, and many fascinating others.

Richard A. Walker is professor emeritus of geography at the University of California, Berkeley where he taught from 1975 to 2012. He has written on a diverse range of topics in economic, urban, and environmental geography, with scores of published articles to his credit. He is co-author of The Capitalist Imperative (1989) and

The New Social Economy (1992) and has written extensively on California, including The Conquest of Bread (2004), The Country in the City (2007) and The Atlas of California (2013). Walker is currently director of the Living New Deal Project, whose purpose is to inventory all New Deal public works sites in the U.S. and recover the lost memory of government investment for the good of all.

Sasha Lilley is a writer and radio broadcaster. She's the host of KPFA's critically acclaimed program of radical ideas, Against the Grain, and the series editor of PM Press' political economy imprint Spectre. Her books include Capital and Its Discontents and Catastrophism:,The Apocalyptic Political Collapse and Rebirth.

KPFA Benefit

Advance tickets: $12 : brownpapertickets.com :: T: 800-838-3006 or Books Inc (Berkeley), Pegasus Books (3 sites), Moe's, Walden Pond Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloway's. East Bay Books $15 door, wheelchair access

http://go.addtocalendar.com

7:30pm to 8:30pm, First Congregational Church, 2345 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA.


Get The Led Out

Get The Led Out
From the bombastic and epic, to the folky and mystical, Get The Led Out (GTLO) have captured the essence of the recorded music of Led Zeppelin and brought it to the concert stage. The Philadelphia-based group consists of six veteran musicians intent on delivering Led Zeppelin live, like you've never heard before. Utilizing the multi instrumentalists at their disposal, GTLO re-create the songs in all their depth and glory with the studio overdubs that Zeppelin themselves never performed. When you hear three guitars on the album...GTLO delivers three guitarists on stage. No wigs or fake English accents, GTLO brings what the audience wants...a high energy Zeppelin concert with an honest, heart-thumping intensity.

Dubbed by the media as "The American Led Zeppelin," Get The Led Out offers a strong focus on the early years. They also touch on the deeper cuts that were seldom, if ever heard in concert. GTLO also include a special "acoustic set" with Zep favorites such as "Tangerine" and the "Battle of Evermore" being performed in its' original instrumentation with guest singer Diana DeSantis joining the band.

GTLO has amassed a strong national touring history, having performed at major club and PAC venues across the country. GTLO's approach to their performance of this hallowed catalog is not unlike a classical performance. "Led Zeppelin are sort of the classical composers of the rock era," says lead vocalist Paul Sinclair. "I believe 100 years from now they will be looked at as the Bach or Beethoven of our time. As cliché as it sounds, their music is timeless."

A GTLO concert mimics the "light and shade" that are the embodiment of "The Mighty Zep." Whether it's the passion and fury with which they deliver the blues-soaked, groove-driven rock anthems, it's their attention to detail and nuance that makes a Get The Led Out performance a truly awe-inspiring event!

Paul Sinclair - Lead Vocals, Harmonica
Paul Hammond - Electric and Acoustic Guitars, Mandolin, Theremin
Jimmy Marchiano - Electric and Acoustic Guitars, Vocals
Andrew Lipke - Keyboards, Guitar, Vocals, Percussion
Adam Ferraioli - Drums, Percussion
Phil D'Agostino (Bass)
Eddie Kurek - Bass, Vocals

8pm to 10:30pm, The UC Theatre Taube Family Music Hall, 2036 University Avenue, near Downtown Berkeley BART, Berkeley, CA, 94704